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Beaches & Bays in Gozo
One of the joys of being in Gozo and Comino is that, no matter where you are, you're never far from one of the many magnificent beaches or secluded little coves.

There is a choice of both sandy and rocky beaches on the Islands, offering practical areas for the family, scenic spots for the romantics, serene areas for those in want of peace and spots for those who are interested in a bit of summer sports fun.


The following are some of the most popular:


GOZO
• Dahlet Qorrot
• Dwejra
• Hondoq Ir-Rummien
• Marsalforn
• Mgarr ix-Xini
• Qbajjar
• Ramla Bay
• San Blas
• Wied il-Ghasri
• Xlendi Bay


COMINO
• Blue Lagoon
• Santa Maria Bay
• St. Nicholas Bay




Swimming

The Maltese coastal waters are generally clean and safe for swimming as there are no tides.  Some bays are exposed to north and north-easterly winds which do produce some strong undercurrents at times.  


Useful Tip: The Maltese Islands' beaches and seas are safe, however if you are new to the Maltese Islands, swim where the locals do.


Sun Bathing

The Maltese Archipelago lies virtually at the centre of the Mediterranean and has a latitude more southerly than that of northern Tunisia.  You are therefore advised to take precautions to ensure you avoid over exposure to the sun.  

Even in winter it is advisable to wear a suitable factor sunscreen for your skin type.  This is important if you are out walking, or taking part in water sports.  A sun hat is a must. Children and especially babies need extra protection from the sun.  If you are sunbathing, it is advisable to avoid the strongest sunlight between the hours of 11am and 3pm in peak summer months.




Dahlet Qorrot

This is a tiny picturesque fishing cove and a tranquil, isolated spot on the north-east coast below Nadur and Qala.  The bay is a popular local beauty spot.  The craggy coastline and clear waters are perfect for snorkelling.  The bay is still used by local fishermen: a few boathouses line the shore. The ledges and small caves double up as shade areas.  There is a snack-bar facility in the summer only. In winter, you will find the bay the perfect spot to sit and read, watch the waves and enjoy solitude.


Dwejra

Dwejra is perhaps the archipelago's most spectacular natural landmark.  Here, geology, time and sea have worked together to produce some of the most remarkable scenery on the Islands - The Azure Window, the Inland Sea, Fungus Rock, sheer cliffs and a rocky coastline yielding fossilised remains of sea creatures dating from the Miocene period. Apart from the topography visible above sea and ground, there are also some fascinating underwater caves which provide excellent dive sites. The Azure Window, a table-like rock over the sea, is one of the most photographed vistas of the Islands, and it particularly spectacular during winter when waves crash high inside the arch. The Inland Sea, and Dwejra Bay itself, were created millions of years ago when two limestone caves collapsed. The shallow inland lagoon is linked to the sea via a 50-metre cave. The `Sea' is used by fishermen, swimmers and as access point for divers. Overlooking the lagoon is the Chapel of St Anne, built in 1963 on the site of a much older church. The other natural landmark here is the legendary Fungus Rock.


Hondoq ir-Rummien

The coastline below the village of Qala is dotted with traditional salt pans, some of which are still actively used to `harvest' salt throughout the summer months. On this coast is a small cove, Hondoq ir-Rummien, which is popular with snorkellers because of its deep and clear water and the small caves at water level. Access to the sea is from bathing ladders. The cove has good views over Comino.


Marsalforn

Marsalforn, meaning 'bakery harbour', is Gozo's main seaside town. During the summer, it becomes a bustling, lively resort. There is a small but pleasant sandy bank on the harbour with safe bathing and good rocky coastline towards Qbajjar which is excellent for snorkelling. The resort has a good range of accommodation from seafront self-catering apartments to hotels. Marsalforn is characterised by its harbour-side cafes and restaurants, many serving fresh fish. The small harbour is the main port for a fleet of traditional 'luzzijiet' trawlers and smaller fishing boats. The beauty of Marsalforn is its relaxed atmosphere, even in the height of summer.


Mgarr ix-Xini

Limits of Xewkija (Gozo). A small , picturesque bay within a creek and a steep sided valley. No facilities, but good for snorkelling.


Qbajjar

Located in the seaside resort of Marsalforn, il-Qbajjar is a pebbly beach with several spots for swimming off the rocks to its left and right. Just round the corner from Qbajjar are the salt pans, carved out of the rocks centuries ago for the collection and production of salt.


Ramla Bay

Ramla is Gozo's largest sandy bay and one of the most beautiful on the Maltese Islands. The beach here is of a deep, reddish-gold hue. The bay is surrounded by countryside and nestles below steep terraced hills and the mythical Calypso's Cave. There are no hotels or tourist developments nearby, but the beach side has several snack bars and cafes. The beach has its own landmark - a white statue of the Virgin Mary. Ramla is a superb spot to while away the hours - even in peak summer months, there always seems to be space on beach. In winter, you can find yourself alone. The area is excellent walking country. Swimming here is safe and the waters are clear and clean. There are some smooth, underwater boulders a few metres out in the central strip, but these are easily negotiated. On windy days, white surf rolling on the sand is an added attraction and fun for young bathers. The best approach to the bay is from Nadur or Xaghra, down a bamboo-lined valley. The road from Marsalforn, via Calypso's Cave, is rather steep and rough though it is passable by car. Of historical interest in the bay are some Roman ruins burried under the sand near the present-day cafes, and a 'fougasse' - a kind of primative mortar developed by the Knights which was fired from a rock-cut shaft to defend the bay during the 18th century.


San Blas

San Blas is a tiny, rocky bay set in secluded countryside tucked below steep terraced hills on Gozo's north-east coast. It is a favourite spot for snorkelling and picnics. There are no facilities here, and only a small parking area with room for a couple of cars. The best way to approach San Blas is perhaps on foot, around 20-30 minutes, from Nadur. The fertile valley leading down to San Blas and the neighbouring inlet, Dahlet Qorrot, was a favourite hunting ground of the knights. One of their coastal towers, Ta' Sopu (1667), stands on the headland.


Wied il-Ghasri

Wied il-Ghasri has its source at Dbiegi Hill. It winds its way through Ghasri between Zebbug and Giordan Hill and flows into the sea between very high impressive cliffs. Wied il-Ghasri is very popular with divers who like to explore the surrounding underwater caves.

The very narrow bay is a haven for those who seek a quiet bathing area. A very interesting spot in this place is a cave close to the shore in which a shaft was hewn up to the top of the steep cliffs. A mill made up of several pails used to be rigged up in order to bring up the sea water to fill the neighbouring saltpans.


Xlendi Bay

The delightful sea inlet, known as Xlendi Bay, lies at the end of a deep, lush ravine which was a river bed. Until the mid 20th century, Xlendi was a small fishing port and a restful summer resort for a few locals and Maltese. The bay is now on the must-visit list of most day-trippers to the Island, but it is worthwhile lingering a night or two to enjoy the sunsets. The Bay still retains a peaceful atmosphere and is surprisingly undeveloped though there is a good choice of accommodation from apartments to hotels; most options have sea views. Xlendi is flanked by steep cliff. For some of the best views, climb the stairs up the cliffs to the right. Bathing in Xlendi is usually off the rocks along the bay with access down ladder into the deep crystal clear water. On the left side of the bay, two tiers of pathways provide ample space for both a walkway and a flat space to spread out a towel and sunbathe. On the promontory is Xlendi Tower, built in 1650. It commands superb sea views and stand on a scenic coastline pitted with hand-dug salt pans.



Blue Lagoon

The tiny isle of Comino, only 3.5 sqr kms, is the perfect hideaway. Named after the cumin herb once grown here, Comino is the perfect retreat - carefree and car-free. Comino has been put to different uses over the centuries by the Islands' various rulers. It was inhabited in the Roman period, but did not have much significance until the Knights arrived. It then had a dual role as a hunting and recreational ground and as part of the coastal watch tower defence of the Islands. The Islands' main attraction today is the Blue Lagoon, a sheltered inlet of shimmering aquamarine water. It is a popular day trip for cruises. The Lagoon together with the isle's other bays - St Mary's and St Nicholas' - with their crystal clear waters make Comino the ideal choice for most kinds of water sports, especially diving and snorkelling. Comino is worth a visit all year round. In winter, it is ideal for walkers and photographers. With the clear warm seas, water sports enthusiasts will find Comino's only beach hotel offers a full range of water sports and amenities.



Santa Maria Bay

The tiny isle of Comino, only 3.5 sqr kms, is the perfect hideaway. Named after the cumin herb once grown here, Comino is the perfect retreat - carefree and car-free. Comino has been put to different uses over the centuries by the Islands' various rulers. It was inhabited in the Roman period, but did not have much significance until the Knights arrived. It then had a dual role as a hunting and recreational ground and as part of the coastal watch tower defence of the Islands. The Islands' main attraction today is the Blue Lagoon, a sheltered inlet of shimmering aquamarine water. It is a popular day trip for cruises. The Lagoon together with the isle's other bays - St Mary's and St Nicholas' - with their crystal clear waters make Comino the ideal choice for most kinds of water sports, especially diving and snorkelling. Comino is worth a visit all year round. In winter, it is ideal for walkers and photographers. With the clear warm seas, water sports enthusiasts will find Comino's only beach hotel offers a full range of water sports and amenities.


St. Nicholas Bay

The tiny isle of Comino, only 3.5 sqr kms, is the perfect hideaway. Named after the cumin herb once grown here, Comino is the perfect retreat - carefree and car-free. Comino has been put to different uses over the centuries by the Islands' various rulers. It was inhabited in the Roman period, but did not have much significance until the Knights arrived. It then had a dual role as a hunting and recreational ground and as part of the coastal watch tower defence of the Islands. The Islands' main attraction today is the Blue Lagoon, a sheltered inlet of shimmering aquamarine water. It is a popular day trip for cruises. The Lagoon together with the isle's other bays - St Mary's and St Nicholas' - with their crystal clear waters make Comino the ideal choice for most kinds of water sports, especially diving and snorkelling. Comino is worth a visit all year round. In winter, it is ideal for walkers and photographers. With the clear warm seas, water sports enthusiasts will find Comino's only beach hotel offers a full range of water sports and amenities.